Tame your inner bridezilla vol 2 – Do teamwork, and then, be in love

[intro]Having seen a bit of the HR and recruiting processes during my time in a software company, there have been a few highlights that ring true in any field of life. You search for people that have the greatest potential. Last week I wrote about uncertainty and how it’s not a bad thing. This time I uncover some important traits of a decent vendor, for me as an occasional wedding photog, at least.[/intro]

The “I just shoot and I’m off” type

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Imagine a photographer who has been in the business for, say 10 years. They make great pictures, for sure, otherwise they wouldn’t be in business. But on the wedding day they don’t get along with the videographer, they almost miss important parts of the reception because they are not approaching the planner or DJ or couple to get to know about the slight change in schedule.
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Will you get decent images? Possibly, yes. Would you recommend the photog to your bridesmaids? Well… The images are good, some even great, but the photographer just was not a good team player with the other vendors. So if a great experience is what they are looking for, you’d probably send the bridesmaids looking elsewhere.

So what’s the key here? Look for people who are enthusiastic about your wedding and would go to the moon to make it work.
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Wedding at Kõltsu Manor

Identifying the good ones

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The value a wedding vendor brings is not the service they ALONE can provide. It’s the combination of that service with everything else that is happening. So, teamwork is not optional, it’s essential.

So how do you know if your vendor is a good team player. 2 things. Read the feedback from couples and wedding forums. And, talk to them. Do they want to know you and your plans? Do they want to know your other vendors? If they ask zero questions and give you a price and a template description, it’s kind of a turn-off.
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As one of the living legends of wedding photography and a master of workflow and customer service, Jasmine Star, has said – a good experience is about setting expectations. On the photographer’s side of things, this means you should know how long it takes to do the group shots with the number of guests you have, how long does it take for you to get the images etc. The photographer should build that expectation, so you know what will happen.
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Taming your inner bridezilla, literally

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But let’s turn the tables. If you are to be the perfect couple, you should try and do the same with the vendors and bridal party. Try to imagine what you are expecting from them, note it down and make sure you communicate it. If you state something obvious, no-one will mind. They are all there to help you at the end of the day.
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Sure, there’s a line between setting expectations and becoming a control freak. But if you consciously do it, there’s a great chance you will have the wedding day you expected.

So, be open, collaborate, and expect that from everyone in your wedding coordination team.
And then, just be in love.
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Prev Tame your inner bridezilla vol 1 - About uncertainty
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